Control Interview Stress Through State Management Technique

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Control Interview Stress

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Our mind controls us. How we think of ourselves controls us. These can be positive or limiting factors in our career progression. At interview we need to control interview stress. You will probably only get one chance for that role. So instead of your mind controlling you, teach it to control interview stress. If you do this a number of times, you will start to see results, and not only at interview.

Introduction to State Management for Controlling Interview Stress

Use the following technique for creating any state you desire. Relaxation, ‘ready for action’, excitement, or any other state you would want for certain situations. This process has been labelled as ‘anchoring’.

The mind cannot tell the difference between real and clearly imagined events! So if you have a nervousness about interviews, chances are that you have either experienced a stressful interview, or you have imagined how bad they could be.

What is Anchoring to Control Interview Stress?

An anchor is a specific stimulus that we can use to invoke a feeling of success (or another) state. Used repeatedly, it is one of the most powerful personal state management tools available, and will control interview stress. The same rules apply for whatever state you require. It works on the basis of an external stimuli invoking an internal response. For example, we have had a time when we caught a smell in the air, and suddenly you get a flood of memories and feelings associated with those memories. In this case the small is the external stimuli. Another example might result in a fear of dogs. Where does that come from? Well, you have been bitten or simply was scared by a dog. Now seeing a dog (external stimuli) you may immediately get the feelings associated with being scared by a dog or bitten by one. The mind has ‘generalised’ the single incident to one of being scared by all dogs. The generalisation is there to protect you based on your previous experiences.

Here is the scary bit. They do not have to be real experiences. The mind cannot tell the difference between real and clearly imagined events! So if you have a nervousness about interviews, chances are that you have either experienced a stressful interview, or you have imagined how bad they could be.

And now the good bit. We can use exactly the same technique your mind uses to create the worry about interviews. However, now we will use it to control interview stress.

The Process of Anchoring to Control Interview Stress

Here is the scary bit. They do not have to be real experiences. The mind cannot tell the difference between real and clearly imagined events!
For demonstration, we will use success as the required state in order to control interview stress. Please remember that you can use this to create any other ‘states’ you wish.

Suppose you remember a time when you felt especially good about something you had done. A time you won something. A time you did a presentation, and the audience loved it. A time you got a salary raise because your manager thought you deserved it. It really does not matter what the event was. It only matters that you felt successful. Once you have that memory, read these instructions, then shut your eyes, and play them out.

  • Go back to that scene and replay it as if it was a video of that event
  • Make sure you are associated with that scene. Notice the colours and make them brighter. If the picture is still, make it move. If you are not in the picture, introduce yourself into it. If the picture is distant, zoom in.
  • Listen to the sounds and make them more crisp.
  • Now, remember the feelings and feel them all over again.
  • And while you play with these aspects of your event, notice what happens to the way you feel.
  • Just before the feelings reach their peak, run your finger down the knuckle of your other hand.
  • Now slowly begin to open your eyes bringing those feelings with you.

Do this sequence FIVE or more times and you will find that you have created a stimulus/response mechanism. The external stimuli of running your fingers down the middle knuckle of your other hand is associated with the feelings of success. This means that whenever you want the feeling of success back, running your finger down the middle knuckle will give it to you. This will control interview stress and turn it (with practice) into a feeling of success.

You must keep repeating this or you will begin to loose the anchor!

Repeat, repeat and repeat again!

Using State Management for other Needs

If you want to control other states, use a different external stimuli specific for that state. For example, if you wanted to create a state of relaxation, then you would think about a time you were most relaxed. Follow the process, but then choose a different part of the body. You might tap one shoulder, or pinch the nail of your little finger on one hand into your thumb on the same hand. It really is up to you.

The next technique is an actors technique often called ‘centring’ or ‘steadying’.

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